Morris-Jumel Mansion

Time for a history lesson! For my birthday, I decided to give myself a little homework. Yes, the assignment is late, but I hope it was worth the wait. The house pictured above is the Morris-Jumel Mansion, which is watched over by the Historic House Trust and NYC Department of Parks and Recreation, operated by Morris-Jumel Mansion Inc. It is one of the many historic houses located in New York City, but the only one lucky enough to be a destination on my 25th birthday. It also happens to be the one where one of the Founding Fathers spent the night, where some of our country’s greatest minds broke bread, where scandal too juicy for soap operas brewed, and where ghosts roam the rooms to tell their side of the story.

The idea to visit this historic site came from my good friend who was visiting for the week. Since we both owned DSLR Nikons, it seemed like the opportune time to practice our photography and learn a thing or two about it and the history of our nation. Joined by our lovely assistant, we spent the afternoon hiding from the heat (92 degrees in the shade, and the entire night) and having a wonderful time. We kept the ISO around 800 because even at f-2.8 and a shutter speed of 1/6 of a second at times, the house was very dark. Flash photography was not allowed, due to the light sensitive artifacts. There are quite a few photos in the gallery, each one teeming with vital information about our nation’s history. Be sure not to miss any!

I had a lot of fun researching for this post! However, if any of my research is no where near what’s true, please tell me! Leave a comment and correct my mistake. Most of my research I did through various websites, both accredited and not. Lesson to be learned from this outing: Bring a pad and paper. Each and every room is trimmed with information that I would have found very valuable for this post, partially because it would have saved me from all the research I did do, but also because then it would have saved me from the guess work of trying to determine which was telling the truth. There were a few contradictions, such as which room Eliza Jumel married her second husband, and what year they were married. I have a small notebook that I am now placing in my camera bag, along with about 5 pens (you can never have too many of those), so this slip of the mind will never happen again.

Websites Used for Research:

http://www.historichousetrust.org/item.php?i_id=20

http://www.morrisjumel.org/history/index.php?sec=hist

http://www.findingdulcinea.com/guides/Entertainment/Holidays/Halloween/Haunted-New-York.pg_04.html

http://gonyc.about.com/od/halloween/a/haunted_newyork.htm

http://www.essortment.com/all/hauntedmansion_rund.htm

http://pdfhost.focus.nps.gov/docs/NHLS/Text/66000545.pdf

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